Breathing made easier…

Breathing made easier….

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Breathing made easier…

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Here is a bit of information I would like to share, CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) I had a doctors visit last week and was told my breathing exhaling and inhaling pressures were low due to muscle weakness, our primary physician Kaiser had this device delivered to our home.  A wonderful representative demonstrated how the CPAP worked and explain the benefits of using this device when going to bed.  It’s a mask that fits over your nose and straps around your head.  It’s a humidifier as well, and distilled water must be used.  This prevents your breathing passage for drying up while you sleep.  Because of the ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and lack of exercise my lugs don’t expanded fully causing the lack of pressure when exhaling or inhaling.  And feeling out of breath due to muscle weakness.  Our physician explained how this would allow me to have more energy during the day simply because I wouldn’t over exert my lugs muscle while sleeping.  This CPAP device would assist my breathing to lessen the use of my own lug muscles and expanding them every three seconds.  I’ve used this twice now, it’s difficult at first, because the tube and mask limits your head positions.  And you must keep your mouth closed while in operation mode.  If you open your mouth while in process sensation of exhausting oxygen in a high rate of speed, which doesn’t feel normal coming out of your mouth.  My thoughts are this CPAP provides the additional oxygen needed to expand my lugs while I’m asleep.  Breathing is much easier and the only issue keeping my mouth closed.  I also experience a sensation of air bubbles in my stomach, but overall I believe it will help my breathing going forward.

Anything to provide more energy during the day is essential and provide much-needed lug exercises.  So I say to all my PALS, do whatever it takes until they find a cure for this illness or disease.  I will post an up-date next week and let everyone know the process.  Sharing information is key and vital, every little bit helps.

It’s been 10 months now, and still going strong, thoughts and prayers to everyone fighting the good fight, whatever it is.  We were all built to last.

There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is.

Albert Einstein ~

really not starting over…

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I see my acupunctures twice a week, she’s wonderful, May Liu and I enjoy our conversations very much.  Each topic of discussion is directed towards positive thoughts and healing, I love her views on life, her Buddhism beliefs and faith are strong.  I’m Catholic by faith, but everything we discuss seems to link-back in one-way or the other.  She explains are bodies are but shells until a transcendent state in which there is neither suffering desire, nor sense of self, and the subject is released from the effects of karma and the cycle of death and rebirth.  I find this fascinating because our Catholic faith teaches us to be disciples for God, in helping others build better relationships with everyone and yourselves.  And not to hold on to negative thoughts or grudges.

The search continues to find the piece of the puzzle where are minds can heal us.  True purpose of why we exist is to share this wonderful spiritual sense we all desire peace and love and positive thoughts with everyone.  The mind used in this way can heal and overcome illnesses and unwanted stress.  She explains that meditations is the heart of buddhism way of life.  Meditations helps with blocking out the negative thoughts of delusions and promotes happiness and wellness for our bodies.  Doing this once a day can begin the healing process, find the time and meditate help find your peace each and everyday.

The Catholic faith teaches us about loving God and his healing powers such as  miracles, and prayers needed to overcome ones illness, which would be the same as meditating and focusing on positive results.  I believe both ways are critical when looking for cures no one knows about or understands.

So the message for this post is to believe all things are possible, there are no right ways only methods not yet revealed.  There are many pills and medicines to choose from so before running out to the local drug store, look into the mirror and ask yourselves do I have the healing abilities needed to cure myself.  It starts with you believing your mind and with help from positive thoughts or lots of prayers and faith, we can heal ourselves.  Positive thoughts and taking care of our bodies are the start to many more years of happiness with family and friends.  I’m not saying to disregard what your physician is telling you but look at other ways of healing yourself is key.  Don’t sit around and wait for something to happen, get up and start it today.  Life is a gift and shouldn’t be taken for granted.  Our minds when not utilized become like hard candy, so let’s start exercising our minds so they feel like soft jelly.  And everyone like jelly.  So to all my PALS out there, don’t you quit, I can say this because I do understand this illness SUC@ AS@ yes it does.  Share your thoughts and post them or have someone do it for you, your words must be heard.  Sharing things that helps me gets me through the day and will help you.  PALS for Life, it’s not the best club but, I’m okay with that.  So remember everything happens for a reason so use this illness to your advantage.

MIND/BODY/HEALTH; MIND OVER DISEASE: CAN HAPPY THOUGHTS HEAL?

By JANE E. BRODY; Jane E. Brody is the personal health columnist of The New York Times.
Published: March 27, 1988

 

 

 
Leave a pendulum to its own devices and it most assuredly will swing the other way. So it has been lately with a theory of health and healing that treats the mind as a weapon at least as powerful as the best of modern medicaments. After nearly a century stuck on the side of the body, the pendulum has recently cut a wide arc toward the mind.

Consider this list of recently published books, many by doctors: ”The Healer Within,” ”The Healing Brain,” ”The Healing Heart,” ”Healing From Within,” ”Minding the Body, Mending the Mind,” ”Living the Therapeutic Touch,” ”Who Gets Sick” and the current best seller ”Love, Medicine & Miracles,” as well as some still-popular books nearly a decade old like ”Anatomy of an Illness” and ”The Relaxation Response.” The proliferation of titles hints strongly at the current ferment inside and outside of established medicine. It is ferment that should ultimately bring the pendulum back to the middle, with benefit not just to the health-conscious public but probably also to medical practitioners, many of whom are all too aware of the limitations of scientific medicine.

For most of human history, medicine was little more than a bag of mind-altering tricks. Except for some potent herbs that later became the basis for effective pharmaceuticals, the early healers had little more going for them than their ability to inspire trust and invoke images of recovery. In fact, it was not until the advent of scientific medicine near the turn of this century that physical ministrations began to overshadow – and at times nearly obliterate – the impact of mental states on resistance to and recovery from illness.

The influence of biophysical medicine was further strengthened by the convenient separation of the human organism into a psyche and a soma and the rise of psychiatry as a distinctly separate field of medicine, its practitioners rarely consulted when the soma malfunctioned.

In the 1940’s and 50’s there was a brief revival of interest in the impact of mind on body as psychiatrists like Dr. Franz Alexander and later Dr. Flanders Dunbar formulated and popularized what came to be known as psychosomatic medicine. This discipline depicted emotional upheaval and certain personality types as important contributors to certain physical ailments, suggesting that adjustments in feelings and thoughts might prevent disease or promote recovery. Unfortunately, rather than pursue scientifically the many remedial hints offered by psychosomatics, physicians who heeded the field at all tended to dismiss such diseases as ”all in the mind” and their victims as ”crocks” who took up far too much of the doctor’s time. Or they simply shipped such patients off to psychiatrists.

Following publication of Dr. Hans Selye’s great works on the physiology of emotions, ”The Stress of Life” (in 1956) and ”Stress and Distress” (in 1974), a small but determined constituency that favored reuniting body and mind began to form within mainstream medicine. Researchers gathered an impressive body of circumstantial evidence: excessive rates of illness and death among the bereaved and divorced, triple the heart attack rate among hurried, hard-driving overachievers, a disproportionate number of cancers among people who felt helpless and hopeless, to cite a few examples. The undisputed existence of the placebo effect – the ability of a sugar pill to relieve physical symptoms – was in itself convincing evidence of a strong mind-body influence.

Still, it took a revolution in neurochemistry and immunology to produce the concrete evidence needed to give mind-body discipline the credibility it is now beginning to enjoy. Just in the last few years researchers have shown, for example, that placebos influence brain chemicals that in turn can relieve pain and promote healing; that undue emotional stress can depress the body’s immunological responses, and that an aggressive attitude toward illness can bolster those responses. Indeed, if studies in laboratory animals can be applied to humans, it is likely that some people ”learn” to get sick by subconsciously deranging their immune systems, which should also mean that people can learn to get well.

It is now known that cells of the brain and the immune system share receptors for messenger neurochemicals, providing a communications network by which emotions can be translated into bodily changes. These findings have given birth to a new science: psychoneuroimmunology, popularly called PNI, which, despite the skepticism of many doctors, has already become a pet topic of the self-help movement.

Which brings us to the current spate of books aimed at a public somewhat disillusioned with dispassionate scientific medicine and anxious to do what it can to weight the odds on the side of recovery and wellness. Are people being led down a garden path of unproven remedies? Are they abandoning therapies that have been scientifically established as effective in favor of emotionally attractive but useless quackery? Are they being duped into thinking that they are somehow personally responsible for their illnesses and therefore also responsible for getting well?